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Three of our wines were reviewed in the November issue of Wine Enthusiast and awarded very high scores and even better words.

97 Donkey & Goat 2010 Fenaughty Vineyard Syrah (El Dorado). A seriously top of the heap California Syrah. This complex, interesting wine sings of black pepper and garrigue, fleshy in just-ripe cherry, leather and dark plum. From the mountainous Fenaughty Vineyard, always a good source, it finishes long and will age gorgeously if you can possibly wait to drink it; that pepper will mellow

This wine is highly allocated and only available in our HOLIDAY SAMPLER. It was also #8 on their top 100 cellar wines for the year.

95 Donkey & Goat 2010 Perli Vineyard Syrah (Mendocino Ridge). This Perli is a gem, a gorgeous reminder that California Syrah can be a liquified representation of beauty. Carrying violet overtones, the wine offers just-picked raspberry and a pronounced entry of peppery spice. Soft it has a long finish and complex subtleties approaching magic. Sit this wine in your cellar if you dare—it’s so good to drink now. —V.B.

This wine is  sold out.  We will be tasting on November 29th at the winery.

96 Donkey & Goat 2012 Grenache Noir Grenache (El Dorado). Spicy in aroma and mouthfeel, this is a wondrous wine, gorgeous in lovely ripe cherry and strawberry and completely enveloped in thrills of white pepper. Those who love cooler climate Rhônes will find much to ponder and celebrate here. Racy, it is fragrant and lean, made without fining or filtering. Seek this one out. —V.B.

This wine will be available in a holiday gift pack starting November 27th.

92 Donkey & Goat 2012 Improbable Chardonnay (El Dorado). Intense in minerality, Improbable imparts a subtle oak influence lurking behind its essential freshness of apple, lime and is silky in texture. Energetic, it’s clean and expressive, a vibrant showcase of California-meets-Burgundy in El Dorado, a region not always thought of for Chardonnay. —V.B.

This wine is  sold out.  We will be tasting on November 29th at the winery.

Popcorn with Donkey and Goat’s Lily’s Cuvee

These pairings of movies and wines are all, more or less, exercises in abstraction. The reality is you’ll probably be pairing your wine more often with popcorn than with whatever’s on the screen. To go with that, Vann suggests an American petillant-naturel: Lily’s Cuvee, made in Berkeley, CA, from grapes grown in the nearby Anderson Valley. Pet-Nat, as devotees call it, is, says Vann, “a naturally sparkling wine. Basically, it’s bottled with live yeasts and sugar. It gets drier and more pressurized as it ages. The Donkey and Goat’s Lily’s Cuvee is amazing. It’s really yeasty and mineral, but it has a lot of fruit. It’s 100 percent Chardonnay, and it’s weird because it’s, like, I’ve been shunning big fruity Chardonnays for years now. And this is not exactly a fruit bomb, but the hint of residual sugar is really cool, and useful with savory food. Drink it out of the bottle, after sneaking it into the theater.”

Matthew Kronsberg, Bon Appetit
Fall Movie Wine Pairings with Justin Vann
August 15, 2013

Lily’s is number 5

 

5. Lily’s Cuvée 2012 Chardonnay, Donkey and Goat 
Buoyant and unfiltered, made from Anderson Valley grapes by a Berkeley urban winery ($29.95 at Vine Wine).

Robin Raisfeld and Rob Patronite, New York Magazine
Pét-Nat, Champagne’s Hip Younger Sister, Hits Its Peak Season
July 22, 2013

Nice mention in the Wall Street Journal.   So far, Stu Smith of Smith-Madrone Winery  has not responded to my offer to taste.

That sounded all well and good. But would a vintner agree? I called Jared Brandt, a well-regarded natural winemaker and proprietor of Donkey & Goat Winery in Berkeley, Calif., and asked for his definition. “Natural wine is open to interpretation,” said Mr. Brandt. “People have their own concepts of what it means.” (Mr. Brandt, and his wife, Tracey, offer their full thoughts on the subject on the “Manifesto” page of their website,donkeyandgoat.com.)

Mr. Brandt said that he thinks the one thing that “people can seem to agree on” is that natural wines cannot be made with commercial yeast. Winemakers use different types of yeasts—some are “wild,” i.e., occurring naturally, while others are cultured for the specific qualities they impart.

Lettie Teague, Wall Street Journal
The Facts Behind the Rise of Natural Wine
July 5, 2013

Do the best rosés come from overseas?

Contrary to popular belief, some of the finest rosés are produced domestically. “It’s surprising, but in America there are some really delicious rosés,” says Joe Campanale. “Robert Sinskey in Napa is a standout, and it’s completely biodynamic. Donkey & Goat‘s rosé in Berkeley is also really excellent, as well as Lieb Cellars liebcellars.com in Long Island.’

Lindsay Silberman, July 2013
Dujour

We are humbled and proud to be on this short list complied by Eric Asimov of inspiring vintners leading the California wine renaissance. And that is the Broken Leg Vineyard Syrah (The Recluse) block behind us!

….”A new wave of energetic California winemakers has helped to push stylistic boundaries while bringing more attention to older producers who had been considered behind the times or out of fashion. These newer producers have been shaped by the same worldwide diversity of wines as their audience. They have been inspired not just by Bordeaux and Burgundy, Napa Valley and a neighboring producer whose wines received 100-point scores. Instead, they’ve looked to the traditions of northeastern Italy and the Jura, of Galicia and Sicily, of the Rhône Valley, Slovenia and many other lesser-known regions that make this moment so exciting for wine lovers.Their aim is not to slavishly copy these wines, but to be loyal to their inspirations while reflecting their California origins.  Read the article here http://www.nytimes.com/

Eric Asimov June 19, 2013
The Pour,  New York Times

Stephen Tanzer’s International Wine Cellar Annual Coverage of California’s North Coast came out yesterday and there was a lot of praise and accolades but my favorite by far was what Josh Raynolds says about our 2011 Coupe d’ Or.  You can read all of our reviews on this pdf.

Donkey & Goat 2011 Roussanne/Marsanne Coupe D’Or El Dorado Hazy gold. Ripe peach and quince aromas  and flavors are complemented by notes of ginger, honey and white pepper, with a lime zest nuance adding lift. A wild, expansive and deeply flavored, unfiltered wine that shows impressive intensity and chewy texture, with serious weight on the finish. Highly intriguing, but it’s bound to freak out those used to squeaky clean, polite wines. 90pts

Josh Raynolds, May 2012
International Wine Cellar,

 

 

David Lynch (St. Vincent) wrote a great little piece on natural wine for Bon Appétit and includes our Grenache Blanc (new vintage available in June!).

Donkey & Goat: 2011 El Dorado Grenache Blanc
All the “naturalness” you can handle: foot-trodden grapes, wild yeast, low sulfur. A fleshy but mineral white and only 12.6 percent alcohol. $27;

…The fundamental principle of natural winemaking is: Do as little as possible to the wine. Eliminate chemicals from vineyards. When you harvest grapes, let fermentation begin spontaneously, using the ambient yeasts on the skins (industrial-leaning vintners peruse catalogs of yeast strains to custom engineer flavor profiles). Pick the fruit at a reasonable level of potential alcohol. And go easy on the oak–not that aging in oak barrels isn’t natural, but rather that a heavy oak influence is an adornment that goes against the minimal-intervention grain….

David Lynch, May 2013
Bon Appétit

Read More http://www.bonappetit.com/…/natural-wines-made-america-lynch-david.htm

 

A nice write up in Seattle Weekly about our skin fermented wines.

Wine obsessives will tell you that the orange wine craze has come and gone, but a pair of skin-contact whites offered by Donkey and Goat Winery in Berkeley, Calif. suggest the practice shouldn’t be consigned to the scrapbook just yet.

 

Hanna Raskin, Apr 19, 2013
Seattle Weekly

 

Read the full story here: Orange Wines Haven’t Dried Up Yet

 

A nice mention in Washington Post’s  WIne Blog

Snapshots of each region give shout-outs to trailblazer winemakers, “steady hands” who produce consistently good wines, and superstars who are setting ever-higher standards. We meet the usual luminaries, such as Robert Mondavi and Paul Draper, but also young trendsetters such as Jared and Tracey Brandt of Donkey and Goat winery, or rock musician-turned-vintner Maynard James Keenan of Arizona Stronghold Vineyards.

America Wine, a story of great growth
Dave McIntyre, February 12, 2013
Washington Post

Signature drink: Lynch’s goal is to have 100 wines for $100 or less; his tastes are omnivorous and nuanced. By the glass, you might try the 2010 Monteraponi Chianti Classico ($12) or root for the home team with the 2011 Donkey & Goat Grenache Blanc ($13)
.

St. Vincent Gastropub, S.F.
Jon Bonné, December 19, 2012
SF Gate